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One Giant Leap in Style for SpaceX’s First Astronaut

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Daily Brief

Tom Cruise to film movie on International Space Station

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Daily Brief

SLS a leaky launch vehicle

https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/04/new-report-says-sls-rocket-managers-concerned-about-fuel-leaks/

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Space Channel News

How mobile games are saving astronauts

NASA

Millions of miles from a hospital, with a terminal illness. Working this problem has created a truly unique interdisciplinary solution that could pave the way for a revolution in medicine.
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NASA

One of the benefits of space exploration is how it brings so many unique industries together to solve some of our biggest challenges.

In an effort to keep humans healthy on the way to Mars, with little to no support from Earth, the Translational Research Institute for Space Health, is developing a radical new approach to healthcare in an effort to solve one of microgravity’s most painful side effects:

Kidney Stones.

A diagnosis that usually requires surgery, and there’s no ER in space. At least not yet…that’s a hint NBC. Low gravity environments cause a reduction in bone mass and muscle tissue, pushing excess calcium to the kidneys, resulting in extremely painful stones passing through the urinary tract. This alone could halt our progress to the inner planets.

Fourteen ISS crew  members have developed the syndrome in the last 5 years, and with longer missions on the horizon – solving this is a priority – and gaming is the answer.

At the intersection of medicine and entertainment, Level Ex is paving the way for the future of health care in far away environments. “On the way to Mars it’s likely there’ll be a physician on board but Murphy’s Law says it’s going to be the doctor who gets sick,” said Dorit Donoviel.

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Space Channel News

Over 20,000 pieces of orbiting trash

NASA

In the last three months, SpaceX added over 200 satellites to its StarlLinkconstellation, with hundreds more planned this year, eventually growing to over 40,000
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NASA

In the last three months, SpaceX added over 200 satellites to its StarlLink constellation, with hundreds more planned this year, eventually growing to over 40,000

OneWeb, BlueOrigin and other spacefaring nations are building similar, and even larger orbital networks. 

As more objects come online, potential collisions become more likely, which could create a mega-constellation of catastrophic, impenetrable space debris, blocking rockets from leaving Earth. An effect known as the “Kessler syndrome”.

Without a global satellite traffic system in place, the only thing preventing a collision is an automated email. (You’ve got mail – check your spam folder)

DirecTV fears explosion risk from satellite with damaged battery

An issue affecting all areas of commerce. 

Recently, a Direct TV Spaceway-1 Satellite suffered a crippling battery malfunction that could disintegrate the craft, forcing it away from its geosynchronous arc, into the “orbital graveyard” – 300 kilometers above active satellites.

Speeding Satellites On Collision Course Above Pittsburgh Do Not Hit

And just last week, there was a near-miss over Pittsburgh…tracked by LeoLabs

Russian spy satellite has ‘exploded in space’ – and it may have been deliberate

Some satellites aren’t so lucky. Russia’s Kosmos-2491, allegedly designed to inspect and destroy enemy spacecraft, may have disintegrated in an orbital collision event. So far the Kremlin has not commented on the incident.  

As our orbiting economy continues to expand, it’s becoming a troubling trend for astronomers

In November, StarLink satellites were accused of “photo-bombing” an outburst of Alpha Monocerotid meteors.  Bill Cooke, head of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office said the event, was a real eye opener. Bill Cooke, – space weather


A train of parallel satellites can be seen in this time-lapse image taken in ItalyCredit: Farra Observatory
This image of the satellite trains was taken over Russia by a GMN cameraCredit: Farra Observatory
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